Reality Hits Home

On July 15, 2010, in Research, by Chris Prom

I hate to keep harping on this point, but the more I think about it, the more concerned I am becoming that the notion of digital curation is an inadequate notion on which to sell a program for electronic records or digital archives. I know this is not a new point, for example, Adrian Cunningham made it a while back in The American Archivist, as part of a more general argument that archivists should not let others ‘hijack’ the notion of archives.

Over the past few days, I’ve had to grapple with this issue locally, since a campus committee issued a report recommending ways in which the University of Illinois Library (of which the University Archives is one part) “Steward Excellence,’ i.e. cut costs in order to deal with the state budget fiasco that enacts itself daily in Springfield, while hopefully not fatally wounding the University in the process.

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A Question of Data Conservancy/Curation

On July 2, 2010, in Methods, Research, by Chris Prom

Bill Maher sprung by my desk this morning as excited as a puppy regarding something he found in newly-accessioned records that were discovered in the basement of our law school.  The records, generated by a University committee, document a project to survey student incomes and expenses in the mid to late-1950s.  They include published reports, correspondence, raw survey results, and coding keys for the Illiac (mainframe computer) used to crunch the data (pdf).

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